Why BBW is so popular in art area: muse of artists and their histories!

Art plays a critical, emotional, and historical role in the lives of humans. It embodies all that is beautiful about ourselves and the world around us. Painters, musicians, sculptures, and other artists have to tap into a flow of energy and imagination to produce magic. Many refer to this process as channeling the Muse. A muse can be an abstract concept — like God, angels, or divine beings — or it can be defined as an inspirational subject for the artist or art itself.

Visual arts invent a new reality or shine a tinted lens on human existence to share with an audience. During various points during history, BBW have been worshipped as heroes and muses for artists. A term was even coined for a voluptuous woman from one of the most influential painters of the Flemish Baroque tradition, Sir Peter Paul Rubens. Rubens was well-known for painting historical and biblical scenes, but his biggest legacy may have been his fondness for painting nudes of curvy women. He became so famous for his impressions of fleshy ladies that the public began referring to them as Rubenesque. Luscious women are still referred to as Rubenesque to this day, centuries later.

Why BBW? What is so appealing about their bodies to the craft? These are intriguing questions because modern society still has oppressive attitudes toward full-figured women. Tides are turning towards universal acceptance of all body types, but BBW will continue to act as a muse throughout the generations and here is why:

Curves are Visually Interesting

Which appeals to you more, a straight highway or a meandering, curvy country road? What if you had to choose a painting for your wall? Would you buy a single flat color or wavy lines with some depth? Curves are more interesting and a BBW is full of them.

Research and theories conclude that the hourglass shape is the most sexually attractive to heterosexual men. The shape appears in women of all weights, but plus-size woman rock this figure more often than skinny gals. It is the perfect proportion and exists within a balance of full breasts and hips, paired with a tiny waist. Many women don’t have flat stomachs, but it turns out it is the percentage or proportion that matters more than the small waist — so as long as the hips and breasts are wider than the waist it works. Hourglass-shaped ladies are also scientifically more likely to be fertile so men are biologically drawn to them, in art and in dating.

Lady humps and smooth body lines are attractive to men. Most BBW singles dating users are looking for women with certain forms, even if they have never picked up a paintbrush. Sometimes they can’t explain it because it is an unconscious process, but we see the evidence in romantic connections.

BBW are more harmonious

Feminity has long been equated with softness. The curve of the hip, the twist of the waist, the flow of the hair — it all adds to the feminine mystique. A thin girl can have harsh angles or protruding bones. Cheekbones that can cut glass are pretty for modeling shoots, but men don’t necessarily want to bump themselves on a sharp collar bone. A woman with a body with waves like the ocean shows off the fertility and sexiness in the BBW.

Additional features

Hormonal levels and plentiful diet produce some other side effects that are helpful for overall beauty. A woman who is getting plenty of protein and vitamins will have prettier hair, stronger nails, and glowy skin.

By the way, we should emphasize that current beauty and size standards differ from ancient ones. Most of the ladies from the works of famous artists weren’t considered fat. Today every woman which doesn’t meet model weight specifications (something around 50 kg) is at risk of being called overweight. That is not a joke! Some standards we have today are too wild. Women are trying to keep up by dieting and working out at the gym. There is no real joy in such kinds of life. Is it possible to find the real inspiration in a woman with no fire in her eyes? We don’t think so.

BBWs influence on art cannot be denied from Sir Peter Paul Ruben’s Rubenesque women to Sir Mix-a-Lot’s “Baby Got Back.” Modern standards always evolve, but a huge number of immortal pieces of art remind us that real femininity is still alive.

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